Indian Matchmaking is a canny indictment of a fraying institution

These men and women — or boys and girls, as they are referred to in Indian society, perhaps to reinforce their youth and innocence — of Indian origin are in their 20s and 30s, living in India and the US. Credit: Netflix. Indian Matchmaking just takes this concept further. Of course, each of these comes with their own good, bad and ugly. I think the entire experience felt like going on a journey with no idea as to what could turn up next. There have always been matchmakers and, more recently, marriage agencies that connected families. And every Indian family has a Sima Mami who offers women unsolicited, and often blunt, advice to wear more make-up, or hit the gym to lose weight, if they ever hope to get married. Despite this sociocultural context, Indian Matchmaking has generated a lot of outrage, with critics and viewers alike accusing the show of playing up — or, at the very least, not critiquing — everything regressive in Indian society.

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Indian Matchmaking is a Indian documentary television series produced by Smriti Mundhra. Indian Matchmaking was released on July 16, , on Netflix. Mundhra named the casting the biggest hurdle of the show, going through a client list of families and calling to see if they were willing to be on camera. Mundhra also noted that the series initially started with about a dozen singles but with some that “fell off” during production.

“Indian Matchmaking” is an eight-episode series on Netflix capturing the experiences of wealthy Indian-Americans and Indians as they navigate.

And of course I have. I really cannot stress this enough: Agrabah is not a real place! The genre, after all, encapsulates so much of the human condition, from its elegant docuseries to the shows where women throw wine at each other while their husbands mutter anti-gay slurs in the background. High art! A well-lit, well-produced, empathetic docuseries, it follows matchmaker Sima Taparia as she tries to set up Indians both in India and the US for arranged marriages.

But both series have felt unsatisfying to me. Mindy Kaling comes out with something new every few years, which many Indian Americans find exciting, and the work of brown women is sorely needed in a white media landscape. Some Indian people like myself benefit from being Brahmin Hindus with fair skin and straight hair and last names that tell you exactly what caste we were born into. We become a wedge minority.

Indian Matchmaking cast: Where are they now

Essentially, she practices the age-old art of encouraging these crazy kids to just get together, already. By the show’s finale, has Taparia lived up to the title of matchmaker extraordinaire? Are any of the burgeoning couples on Indian Matchmaking still together? Indian Matchmaking gives no answers about the couples’ futures. The show’s finale is open-ended—purposefully so.

She’s going to continue doing this work, on camera and off.

Netflix reality show-cum-docuseries Indian Matchmaking portrays the They seek the help of Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based matchmaker to.

CNN Smriti Mundhra is not at all bothered that people are talking about colorism, sexism and elitism when it comes to “Indian Matchmaking. Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what’s happening in the world as it unfolds. More Videos Why the Netflix show ‘Indian Matchmaking‘ is causing a stir She is the creator of the hit Netflix series that offers an inside look into the work of Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based matchmaker who travels the world helping her client find their “life partners.

After the series recent debut social media was filled with complaints about everything from the privileged lifestyles of some of the participants to the desire that was expressed by some to be matched with “fair” potential spouses.

The breakout star of Netflix’s hit ‘Indian Matchmaking’ is a hilarious, and stubborn Houston lawyer

We use cookies and other tracking technologies to improve your browsing experience on our site, show personalized content and targeted ads, analyze site traffic, and understand where our audiences come from. To learn more or opt-out, read our Cookie Policy. Taparia travels across India and the U. Indian Matchmaking has been controversial in the Indian community, both among people in India, and among the diaspora.

Five years ago, I met with a matchmaker. I was reporting a feature on India’s $​billion marriage-industrial complex — which includes.

Despite it focusing on a practice that could be seen as archaic and almost out of place in , it was a hit among people of all ages, backgrounds and nationalities. For those who had never heard of biodatas, star charts and the very concept of arranged marriage, it was maybe a morbid curiosity that got them deeply involved in the exploits of matchmaker Sima Taparia from Mumbai. The quest of its participants to find everlasting love amid the constraints of culture was played out for everyone to see, judge and make memes about.

But this is a reality that many young people face in India and other South Asian countries, where family comes first, second and third. So, does old school matchmaking still work? Can it be used to find true love? Does it have a place in our world today? For the longest period of my life, I thought my parents had a traditionally arranged marriage. In my teen years I pieced together information casually dropped sarcastically by relatives and realised that it was not! My dad worked as a lab tech in the same college that my mom worked towards her nursing degree and they had a few conversations.

Soon after he left for a job overseas but came to know through his brother that my mom was getting arranged marriage proposals. Obviously, everything worked out.

‘Indian Matchmaking’: Is arranged marriage out of place in 2020? Or still a way to find love?

Her passive-aggressiveness aside, the looks of quiet judgement have made her a meme star and the series a hit. Most Pakistanis are familiar with the trolley routine where a girl brings tea for a prospective groom and his family, but that is not what happens on this show. Instead, the couples are shown bio-datas and asked to go on dates at restaurants and other public places to see if there is enough connection to take the matter further.

The hit show itself is about a matchmaker named Sima who helps arrange a marriage—a traditional form of courtship and matrimony in India—for.

After studying her client, she researches her client base and presents a few potential candidates. Then, the client picks one person for a first date. If the first date goes well, then the couples get to determine the path for their relationship. To sum it up, matchmaking is like a dating app, but with more steps and people involved.

In its essence, the show tries to rebrand the narrative of arranged marriages and correct the assumption that arranged marriages are interchangeable with forced marriages. However, in the process of doing so, it springs up other troublesome issues such as colourism, misogyny and wealth privilege. Taparia, the matchmaker, showed a very obvious preference for fair-skinned candidates as compared to darker Indians throughout the show.

She said being fair was one of the qualities that would make it easier for a client to find a match. This is not something uncommon in Indian society. Lighter skin is considered to be better than darker skin and lots of Indians try to achieve this. India is one of the largest consumers of skin whitening cosmetics with 50 per cent of its skincare market devoted to skin whitening, according to the World Health Organization WHO.

Instead, challenging the idea that lighter skin is better than darker skin on the show could be more helpful.

‘Indian Matchmaking’ creator Smriti Mundhra welcomes backlash

The weekend is a good time to catch up with some reading. They seek the help of Sima Taparia, a Mumbai-based matchmaker to help them in the quest for the perfect spouse. If you have watched the show, you can’t forget Aparna Shewakramani, the feisty lawyer from Houston. YouTube sensation Bhuvan Bam has 18 million subscribers and counting, which makes him one of the most popular YouTubers and comedians in the country.

He just has to release one video to get social media buzzing.

The show’s matchmaker addresses some of the praise and criticism it has garnered, her own arranged marriage and how business is booming.

Follow Us. Who was the mystery man and did the relationship eventually work out? We asked the New York-based physician herself. In an email interview, Rupam tells Vogue India that the couple got engaged during the lockdown and have been quarantining together ever since. So, on the recommendation of a friend, I downloaded the app two years ago when I was ready to date. Quite the contrary, in fact. It took some time, and a lot of first dates. But ultimately, I did find my forever: One who respected my past, accepted me as a mother, and shared the same values as me.

But the foundation of a meaningful relationship lies in kindness, respect and equality with a partner who is considerate and trustworthy—irrespective of where and how you find them. In fact, Joshi has found that women in India are sending twice the number of messages on Bumble compared to women anywhere else in the world. Has lockdown damaged your relationship? How do you have sex in a pandemic? Subscribe Newsletter.

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Funniest Indian matrimonial videos ever PART 2


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